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Analyzing "Marble Lady," an oil painting by Paul Jaisini, New York, 1999

In his art, Jaisini insists on overcoming the dehumanization, the suppression of sensuality. In every historical period, ideas and problems are expressed that will not come to pass. Jaisini seeks to identify this idea in the present, excavate it from the past, and invent it in a new way for the future.

In our murky, anxious world, in the midst of the soul's confusions and the multiplying moral losses, the artist seeks and always finds some big and small islands of "eternal truths," and asserts the indestructible age-long parables that reveal these truths in the new light, in his own system of sign-images.

Jaisini calls his style, "Gleitzeit," which he defines as "style based on depiction of visual flexibility with theoretical flexibility...to achieve composition of enclosure-- art based on the depiction of a circle evolution of understanding and seeing. A kind of art which draws upon imagery and seeks to reveal and abstract idea of the connection within...with a capacity to change visually by the artistic magic changing your subconscious mind. It is a session of Hypnosis which controls you by a disorganized absolute harmony of everything expected from a 'nonexistent' picture."

I realized that the more you look at "Gleitzeit" works and think, the more you see, feel, and understand, but never completely, as given work always has too many aspects. There is always some kind of "space" in the painting, on which the observer feels free, without a persistent prompting of the artist, to use his own system of perception.

To me, "Marble Lady" seems to be a late modern modification of the Greek myth of the sculptor Pygmalion, who used his illusionist skill to satisfy a private fantasy of the ideal woman. Disappointed by the imperfections of the opposite sex, he created Galatea out of marble and during a festival in honor of Venus, Pygmalion prayed for a woman as perfect as his statue. Venus answered his prayer by bringing his statue to life and eliminated the boundary between reality and illusion.

In Jaisini's "Marble Lady," the object of the intense desire remains alluring, yet perpetually distant. Desire of the others is often imagined in terms of a fetish. The so-called civilized man can be considered in his delight of female form.

The Marble Lady in the painting is observed by two types of spectators: the masculine and the non-masculine male. Therefore, the image of the woman is defined through the desire of both spectators, the "unmanly" poet and the macho "savage." The statue of Galatea was and still is the symbol of fictional perfection, a result of the search for ideal woman that parallels the artist's own creative urge. A post-feminist culture has found out a way to reinvent the woman as she once was: eager to appear physically attractive, the man-made woman. The "Marble Lady" enables male domination by being unreachable and desirable.

The construction of such a female identity fiction can inspire both high and low natures. In all of his works, Jaisini unites the high and low principles, integrating art into the material life, breaking out of art's ivory tower.

"Marble Lady" is a compact, pyramidal composition of the "trio." As in all of his works, Jaisini subdues the figures to the articulation of line and its rhythmic connection between forms in space, a sort of analytical process, based on the swinging line, which starts up ideas, shapes, and colors. These line arabesques are highly individual textures of Jaisini's art.

A decorative role of the painting's color is to create the temperature contrast of the heated environment with the marble-cold statue. In modern and postmodern times, there are increasingly fewer outlets for sensual urges and desires which lay at the origin of human society that imposes restrictions. Sexuality remained beyond the scope of most art history. Interaction between male and female is still responsible for the continued functioning of the universe.


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